This technique is designed to help you fall asleep in 100 seconds

Falling asleep quickly is all about clearing your thoughts enough to let your body drift into the subconscious. In a life that is always moving at 100 mph, it seems we — as a society — have lost this art. But I’m going to show you how — with a little practice — you can learn it and use it whenever you wish.

There are multiple ways to do this actually.

You can get up at 4 am every morning and do manual labor for 15 hours. I guarantee you will fall asleep right away. But if you’re doing that already, you probably don’t have an issue falling asleep quickly.

The way I’m going to show you doesn’t require that kind of commitment — although it does require dedication nonetheless. You will need to take the time to train your brain in order for this method to be fully effective.

 

Read before moving on

If you’re a coffee drinker, seriously consider cutting it out if you want to see this work. Coffee — and other types of caffeine — are stimulants which will keep you awake even if you only drink a little bit in the morning. I strongly propose getting off coffee for at least a week before you try this. After you have successfully learned this method, you can phase it back into your diet. Check out my other post on How Coffee Affects Sleep to learn more about that.

This method focuses on training your mind to sleep, even when it may not want to. There are many factors that contribute to how quickly one can fall asleep. For this method, we are going to assume that you have proper sleeping conditions every time you train. That means a dark, quiet room, still, with a temperature that you find comfortable. Please note this is not some quick melatonin pill that will knock you out whenever you want. You must learn this. The technique takes practice, so do not be discouraged if you can’t get it right away. It may take weeks, months, or even years to do it well. You may be able to do it in less, but it will still take much practice.

Typically, I can fall asleep in under 30 seconds — sometimes 1 minute. If I have a lot on my mind at the time, it may take longer. Normally, I won’t be able to force myself asleep if I’m 100% awake. I need to be at least somewhat sleepy in order for the practice to really count.

If you do this training for a while, you will start seeing improvements on how quickly you can drift off. Eventually, you won’t even think about it because it will be automatic. Don’t worry if it seems to be taking forever though — consistency is key.

The Reasoning

Your brain knows what it is like to fall asleep quickly. You’ve done it before at some point in your life. Whether it was right after lunch on Sunday, or while watching a movie late at night. You have the ability to enter sleep mode quicker than you think. You’re just out of practice.  Take this to heart as you train — convince your mind that it does, in fact, know how to do this. At all times, your brain is performing a dozen different processes. It is thinking about multiple things all at once.  In order to fall asleep on command, you must train your brain to block out all activity and transition into sleep. This is — at the core — exactly what you are doing every night when you go to sleep. When you lie in bed trying to sleep, you’re waiting on your brain to switch modes of consciousness.   The brain can take a long time to make this transition, which is why you sometimes just lie there with your thoughts running everywhere. People are different as well. Some might learn this method easily and be falling asleep in under a minute very soon.

And some will take months to learn it. That’s how it was with me.

It’s also important to note that diet always plays a significant role in the success of any sleep changes. A healthy, more balanced diet will assist you in adapting easier. If you eat a lot of processed, fatty foods, you may find yourself having a ton of difficulty. Avoid this beforehand by improving your diet for at least a week before starting to train.

Whatever the difficulty, don’t give up on yourself. You can do this.

The subconscious mind is in charge of switching to sleep mode. Without efficient control of it, sleep will not come easily — even if your conscious mind is demanding it. The method I’ll show you will train your subconscious to listen to the commands of your conscious mind without hesitation.

The Method

Ok so here is the part you’ve been waiting for. If you skipped down to this point, I’d encourage you to read the above sections.

The method includes frequent, timed naps in order to teach yourself to fall asleep quicker. If you have time during the day, start to take short naps each day. Get a timer — it can be on your phone or elsewhere — and set it for 10 – 20 minutes, depending on how much time you have. Most people don’t have 20 minutes in the middle of the day, but if you can find the time anywhere in your schedule, take it. Try to choose a time during the day when you are a bit sleepy. For me, this is usually around 1 or 2 in the afternoon. You want to make sure you are at least a little bit tired, or else you’ll be training your brain to sleep when it doesn’t need to.

Set the timer, lie down, and attempt to fall asleep like you normally would. Try to think about nothing. Have your mind be absent of focus so that it drifts out of consciousness. When your timer runs out, get up and resume your day like usual. Do not hesitate to get up and do not continue trying to sleep, no matter how much longer your schedule will allow you to lay there. This is critical. It’s not easy to do especially if you were just about to fall asleep. But it is important that you obey the timer and move on with your day. While the goal is to fall asleep during this short nap time, don’t worry if you end up just lying there for the whole time. You must train your brain to obey whether you tell it to sleep or get up. It’s okay to do this in the evening too. A good time would be after dinner(6 or 7) — just make sure you don’t accidentally sleep through the night.\

The Method(continued)

The next part involves training your body to get up at the same time each morning. Set your alarm clock for the same time — say 7 am — and get up right when it goes off. No pressing snooze; no laying there until you feel like getting up. You want to make your brain associate being awake with being active. Correspondingly, you want your brain to associate lying down and closing your eyes with sleeping. Go to sleep at the same time every night too, whether that is 8 pm, 11 pm, or 2 am. Make sure you get enough sleep to keep your body rested.

The point is to take out any transition time that often comes along with sleeping or waking up. Condition your brain to recognize sleep as a limited thing. Not something you can just make up whenever. By not wasting time with these transitions, you train the brain to do the same.

Don’t try to compensate a lack of sleep by going to bed earlier. Stay faithful to your schedule even if it’s difficult.

And DO NOT sleep in. At least until you have become good at falling asleep on command.

I know that sounds horrible. But trust me, if you stick to it you will appreciate your newfound skill much more than sleeping in. Personally, I used to rely on Saturday morning to catch up on sleep. Now I don’t even need to.

Needless to say, I have much more productive Saturdays now.

You’re probably thinking — wow this is really strict. And you’re right. It is that way because your brain needs to see this adaptation as a  necessity. Allowing your brain to slack off will only result in more difficulty.

After a while — or however long it takes — you can drop the alarms and sleep whenever you want. If you’ve truly taught your brain to do this, it will stay with you after you stop. The most important thing to remember is to not revert your brain back by falling into old habits. Playing on your phone for an hour, or lying in bed and thinking will only cause your brain to adapt back. You don’t have to be as strict as you were during the training, but still be aware of these things.

Now go. Put this into practice and make the quality of your life better 🙂

 

5 tips to remember your dreams tonight

Dreams are such a mystery. They come and go, night after night, with little to no recollection of their contents or significance. Everyone dreams, but not everyone remembers what their dreams were about. What would happen if we started to remember the things we dream about? What experiences would we have? Would we learn more about ourselves, or would we simply open up another door to an exceedingly vast sphere of mystery? I guess you never know unless you try.

Here are 5 tips to remember your dreams more clearly tonight:

1. Sleep More

This may sound obvious, but there is research that backs it. On average, we dream 4-6 times each night. The y can be long or short, detailed or dull. The goal of dream recall is to remember more of the details to even the dull dreams.

 

After 8 hours of sleep, we often experience up to 45 minutes of dreaming. That’s why we often have long and detailed dreams right before we wake up. Our minds are most likely to have dreams when we enter REM(rapid eye movement sleep). In the last minutes before we wake up, our body has entered a very deep REM cycle that prompts some awesome dreams.

Most people don’t get 8 hours of sleep every night. I don’t either. But if you want to have more REM cycles, you need to sleep more. It’s that simple.

 

2. Wake up in the middle of the night

Set an alarm for 5 hours after you go to sleep. You’re first REM cycle typically starts 4.5 hours after you actually fall asleep — so you should have gotten a solid 30 minutes of quality dreaming in. When you wake up, immediately start recalling what you remember. Take note of images, colors, sounds — and especially dialogue. The more you intentionally recall your dream details, the better you train your brain to do it naturally. Researchers suggest it’s easier to remember a dream when we wake up directly from it. This means that more often than not, you’ll be waking up in the middle of the night.

I know what you’re thinking — that sounds achingly unattractive. Who wants to disrupt a good night sleep halfway through? I understand.

But if you are serious about digging into your subconscious and remembering your dreams, you’re going to have to get a little uncomfortable.

3. Write it down

I’m sure you’ve heard of a dream journal. Many people do it simply because they love journaling, and their dreams give them something to journal about. But the main purpose of writing down your dreams is so that you can refer back to it later. Referring back to past dreams could help produce some reoccurring ones. Dreams that replay over and over again — or have a recurring aspect — are easily identified by the dreamer, making them a key piece in recalling dreams.

Keep pen and paper next to your bed. When you wake up from a dream — either in the middle of the night or in the morning — write down everything you remember about that dream. And I mean EVERYTHING. Where were you? What were you doing? Who was there? Try to recall specifics and rebuild the dream again in your head and on paper.  You can even take it a step further and write down specific things from your dreams on your bathroom mirror, in your car, or on the ceiling above your bed.

If you want, you can work on your memory recalling skills by remembering things you did in the waking day. Write down what you ate for breakfast or what color your best friends lunchbox was. Recreate real-life situations on paper, and you will learn to do the same thing with your dreams.

 

4. Instruct your brain to remember your dreams

When you lie in bed at night, your brain is playing a slideshow of the day’s activities. It makes a note of everything you’ve gotten done during the day and puts more things on the to-do list. What you want to do is put ‘remember my dreams’ on the night’s to-do list.

It turns out that our subconscious minds are highly suggestive. While you are drifting off, repeat something like “I remember all my dreams” over and over again. Use the present tense — instead of saying something like “I recalled my dream yesterday” — because you’re trying to convince your mind to think a certain way.

What this does is send a command to your brain instructing it to remember the dreams you have. And while you won’t be consciously remembering, your subconscious will hear the command too and act accordingly. It sounds quite elementary, I know, but it works!

 

5. Don’t drink alcohol or caffeine before sleep

As you can guess, these depressants — or stimulants — restrain your body from entering REM sleep, the type of sleep where dreams occur most frequently. Alcohol can also suppress your memory which will obviously affect your dream recall. If you can avoid coffee or alcohol for the entire day, that would be ideal. But if you can’t go without and still want to remember some dreams, just make sure it’s been 8 or so hours since the last sip. For more on how coffee affects your dreams, check out my other post: How does caffeine affect dreams?

Remembering your dreams isn’t an easy task. That’s probably why you looked up how.

Try using all of these tips collectively and watch the dreams start flooding in like the Mill River:)

Also, make sure to comment and tell me how they worked for you!

 

How does caffeine affects dreams?

For all of those avid coffee drinkers out there, this question has probably come up. What effect, if any, does caffeine have on my dreams?

A good majority of coffee drinkers will tell you that caffeine produces no detrimental sleep problems; they have built up a tolerance to caffeine which allows them to drink it whenever they want, and still fall asleep without much trouble. But if we look deeper we will find some underlying effects.

Caffeine is known to increase the production of a hormone called cortisol. It’s often created by the body in high-risk situations because it enhances alertness/awareness. A person not in a stressful situation when producing extra cortisol will experience negative effects like stress and anxiety. Of course, the most popular example of a low-stress situation that we engage in all the time is sleeping. For a person attempting to sleep with high levels of cortisol, the best case scenario would be a very light sleep while the worst case would be the development of insomnia.

Studies show a decrease in the quality of sleep for those who drink coffee regularly —which is definitely the case for most.  But it doesn’t always mean they don’t sleep through the night. Caffeine is a stimulant, which means it can abstain your body from entering deeper stages of sleep. For example, a coffee drinker could fall asleep quickly and stay asleep throughout the night, but they might only be in a very light stage of sleep. So naturally, their 8 hours of rest might only feel like 5, and their body will feel extra tired during the day in order to revert back to normal sleep patterns.

 

But what does this have to do with dreams? Well, there is a stage of sleep where you are most likely to have dreams — especially ones you recall. This stage is called REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep and, naturally, it’s the deepest stage of sleep. Coffee drinkers — and particularly those who drink coffee right before bed — have not given their bodies a chance to get rid of the stimulant which causes their body to stay in light stages of sleep. If the body can’t enter stage 3/Delta sleep, then it won’t be able to enter REM, thus causing dreams to be prevented.

For those who take a break from coffee for a few days, vivid dreams could occur because there is no longer a stimulant blocking their passageway into REM sleep.
Has coffee effected the way that you dream in any way?